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  • Justin Brandon

Brasil Dairy, Making Dairy Waste Sustainable


E3’s thermophilic anaerobic digester system turns dairy waste into clean electricity and usable soil supplements, and promotes environmental sustainability.

Anaerobic digestion is the natural breakdown of organic matter in an oxygen-free environment.

“(The system) might be a breakthrough, a breakthrough in a challenge that has faced the dairy industry throughout this country and in California.” – US Congressman Jim Costa

While this process has been applied to a variety of commercial and industrial wastes, cow manure is nature’s most abundant source of biogas raw material that can be converted into clean electricity. The waste remaining after anaerobic digestion (the digestate) can then be treated and used as soil amendments. Unfortunately, the digestate resulting from dairy waste typically creates a soil amendment that contains harmful pathogens and bacteria, so it can only be used on crops grown for the cows’ consumption (the pathogens don’t harm cows). This limitation generally restricts conventional dairy digesters for practical use to the generation of electricity, making it difficult for projects to “pencil out” economically.

E3 uses a better anaerobic digestion process that, in addition to converting harmful dairy waste into clean electricity, also produces sustainable organic liquid and solid soil amendments that have been certified (OMRI without restrictions) to be used on food crops for human consumption. E3’s innovative process expedites the energy production and destroys all harmful pathogens and unwanted weed-seeds in its byproducts.

E3 was honored to celebrate this project accomplishment at a ceremony with US Congressman Jim Costa, California State Assembly Member, Adam Gray, and numerous other civic leaders and leaders in business, agriculture, science and education, at the Antonio Brasil Dairy in October, 2013.

To learn more about biogas, click here!

Note California’s approximately 1.8 million dairy cows produce in excess of 35 million tons of manure annually. Approximately 1% of that manure is currently processed into biogas, and virtually none of it is converted into soil amendments, which can be used on human food crops.


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